Credit: ColumbiaThough The Byrds only used four verses of Bob Dylan‘s original wit, this day in 1965 kicked the veritable fence down between folk and rock, when The Byrds chased the pop panache of the British Invasion and laced it with the harmonious rhetoric of the jingle-jangle troubadour, one-eye winking behind the great rose colored glasses of a generation. The world chimed into “Mr. Tambourine Man” something strong, notching Dylan’s only number one song on the charts ever., a.) because as Bobby D iconically claimed when he visited The Byrds in the recording process, quipping, “Wow, you can dance to that!” And b.) the four verses that the band did wind up using, were a perfect boiling down of the political, religious and psychedelic themes Dylan had originally penned. From its opening fingerpick of the song’s original sweep-strum, those that did “dance to that” may have not been sleepy or going any place, but thus is why they could go “anywhere.” Which is exactly where embracers of the song were going, as Dylan readied his controversial move to the electric guitar while this gem was climbing charts: [LISTEN]

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you

Take me on a trip upon your magic swirlin’ ship

My senses have been stripped, and my hands can’t feel to grip
My toes too numb to step
Wait only for my boot heels to be wanderin’

I’m ready to go anywhere, I’m ready for to fade
Into my own parade, cast your dancing spell my way
I promise to go under it

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you