Quite a shame that Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps didn’t make it into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame until 2012, over 40 years after Vincent’s death at 36-years-young. The Rockabilly extension of the Hall took note in 1997, honoring Vincent with the initial slot. But still, way post-facto a nod to one of the most rabble-rousing figures of early rock.

Wild-eyed greaser poster child, complete with a near-death motorcycle accident, one of his finest statements dropped on this day in 1956, “Be-Bop-A-Lula.” A chug-a-lug backbeat from the band’s 15-years-young drummer following Vincent’s wry hiccup, Elvis-tinged ode to a “baby love,” laced with some ramshackle guitar tumbles, the storied chorus was written over a “dead drunk” encounter with comic-strip character “Little Lulu,” Vincent turning it into a leather-studded catchphrase that shot to no. seven on the Billboard charts shortly after its release. Fun fact – the tune was the first song Paul McCartney ever heard John Lennon play. But on to the original strut after the veritable “girl in the red blue jeans.” You know the girl:

Well, be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby
Be-bop-a-lula, I don’t mean maybe
Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby
Be-bop-a-lula, I don’t mean maybe
Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby love
My baby love, my baby love

Well, she’s the girl in the red blue jeans
She’s the queen of all the teens
She’s the one that I know
She’s the one that loves me so

Say be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby
Be-bop-a-lula, I don’t mean maybe
Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby
Be-bop-a-lula, I don’t mean maybe
Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby love
My baby love, my baby love

Well, she’s the one that gots that beat
She’s the one with the flyin’ feet
She’s the one that walks around the store
She’s the one that gets more more more

Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby
Be-bop-a-lula, I don’t mean maybe
Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby
Be-bop-a-lula, I don’t mean maybe
Be-bop-a-lula, she’s my baby love
My baby love, my baby love